Dog lovers greener than non-pet owners

image

London: Dog-owning families have a lower carbon footprint than equivalent families without a dog. ThatÂ’s the conclusion of a new nationwide survey and in-depth study commissioned by ButcherÂ’s Pet Care.

It found that dog-owning families on average, use 5.4% (760kg per year) less carbon per person than the equivalent non-dog owning families – the yearly equivalent of a round trip to Cairo or Marrakesh. They are also happier in their local community and twice as likely to socialise with neighbours (16% as opposed to 8%).

The study polled over 1500 dog and non-dog owning families and questioned them about lifestyle choices, energy consumption, travel and transport habits. The respondentsÂ’ primary and secondary carbon footprints were then calculated. Results revealed that dog owning families fly, consume and waste less and are also more likely to buy local and recycle.

In fact owning a dog is six times greener than fitting a family home entirely with energy saving light bulbs which reduces a householdÂ’s carbon footprint by only 115kg/year compared to 760kg/year when owning a dog.

As two in ten homes own a dog[1] the entire population of manÂ’s best friend reduces the nationÂ’s carbon footprint by 3.4 million tonnes of CO2 every year, which is one and a half times the entire yearly output of Iceland!

Alison Cockcroft, from family owned Butcher’s Pet Care “As a nation we are always looking at ways to reduce our carbon footprint and it is great to see that dog ownership can really make a difference and help boost green credentials. Not only do our four legged friends keep us as ‘Fit as a Butcher’s Dog’ but they also give us a great excuse to explore our neighbourhood and get to know and support our local community. At Butcher’s Pet Care we believe in natural nutrition so not only can your dog lead a healthy life but he’ll ensure the planet stays healthy too!”

An overview of findings from the survey:

Air flights

Dog owning families are 20% less likely to fly than non-dog owning families. Preferring to holiday in the UK or drive to Europe instead.

Consumption and recycling

The consumption and recycling habits of dog owners is 7.5% more carbon friendly than the equivalent non-dog owning family. This equates to a reduction of 150kg a year, the same as driving 568 miles in a 1.6L Ford Focus.

· Dog owners are 1.4 times more likely to recycle everything (21% vs 15%) than non dog owners. 23% recycle or compost everything they use as opposed to 19% of families without a dog.

· Dog owners are more likely to buy locally produced food, fair-trade produce and in-season fruit and vegetables.

· 19% of dog owners only buy things with little or no packaging as opposed to 14% of non dog owners.

Not only will dog-owners spend less on their gas bills (ÂŁ403.71 as opposed to ÂŁ414.26 for non-dog owners) but they also seem happier in their local community too – 24% of dog owners are very happy compared to 19% of non dog owners. Dog owners are also twice as likely to socialise with their neighbours compared to non dog owners.

For more top tips on leading a green life and responsible dog ownership visit < ahref="http://www.butcherspetcare.com">www.butcherspetcare.com

About ButcherÂ’s Pet Care

Established and family-owned for over 25 years and developed in conjunction with leading nutritionists, ButcherÂ’s recipes are made with Fresh Meat and Nothing Artificial to ensure that your dog receives all the natural nutrition he needs. ButcherÂ’s Pet Care has a strong family heritage and farming roots and believe in simple, honest, good food; thatÂ’s why what is left out of food is just as important as what goes in. So it is guaranteed that there are no artificial colourings, flavourings, preservatives, or added cereal or soya in any of ButcherÂ’s delicious recipes!

Pet arthritis – advice from pet longevity vet Dr Carol Osborne

image

By Dr Carol Osborne

Arthritis is a degenerative joint disease which causes painful inflammation of the joints and affects dogs and cats as well as humans. Recent research reveals that arthritis manifests itself in 95% of dogs even at the age two, and 99% of people at age 35, even if there are no visible signs. Twenty percent of all dogs two years of age and older are afflicted.

Symptoms include limping, lameness, decreased activity, stiffness, reluctance to stand, climb stairs, run and jump. In the case of cats they become reluctant to move and often have accidents outside the litter box.

Although arthritis is more common in large dogs, small dogs and cats are also vulnerable to this condition which destroys the cartilage and connective tissue, which normally act as a cushion and absorbs the shock between bones and joints.

But medical management, weight control and moderate exercise can help many pets to live a relatively pain free life even with this condition. This has traditionally consisted of anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids, which are effective in relieving pain but can carry serious side effects. But new, natural remedies are able to offer similar benefits without the risks. Moderate exercise helps maintain joint mobility and muscle strength for joint support. Weight control also helps reduce the burden of excess soft tissue the joints must support.

Like humans pets can benefit from taking supplements that provide relief from pain while increasing joint lubrication and flexibility and enhancing the joints ability to absorb shock. These should contain a range of ingredients including glucosamine, methylsulfonylemethane (MSM, Green Lipped Mussel, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronic acid, natural chelated minerals, Ester C, enzymes and polypeptides.

Since age, breed, diet, lifestyle, injury and stress can affect the health and function of joints in different ways it is always wise to seek the advice of a professional vet.

Dr Carol can be contacted toll free in the US at 1-866 DR CAROL or by email at drcarol@drcarol.com For more information visit www.drcarol.com

Exercise is good for pets and owners – advice from Dr Carol Osborne

image

PETS AND HUMANS BOTH LIVE LONGER WITH EXERCISE
says top vet Carol Osborne

How Much Exercise Do Dogs Need?
Dogs needs at least 20 minutes of exercise twice a day. The exact amount varies with age, breed, weight and physical condition.

DonÂ’t jump off the sofa one minute and take a ten mile hike the next, dogs, like people, need to get in shape gradually a little bit each day. Try starting with a couple of ten minute walks and you can both build up from there. And if your pet hasnÂ’t taken much exercise recently get the vet to check him/her out before you begin the programme.

One hour of exercise increases your dogÂ’s lifespan by 4 hours. Devise a fitness programme for your dog and you may find that you get as much out of it, if not more, than your dog.

Exercise Is Fun With Your Dog!
Exercise is integral to life. Not only is it essential for optimal health, it also improves circulation, stimulates vital organs, facilitates digestion and helps eliminate harmful toxins from the body. Exercise provides aerobic activity that stimulates your dog mentally and physically. And exercising with pets is fun. It is a great way to bond, and it is as good for you as it is for your dog. Most owners end up looking forward to this “special time” as much as their dog does.

Some enlightened fitness centres open their doors to people and pets – use it or loose it doesn’t just apply to people.

Exercise Goals

Exercise promotes confidence, self-esteem and well being. If you make the commitment to eat right and exercise at least 20 minutes twice a day, you and your dog will look good and feel great! Exercise enhances your health, your looks and your life. Before long youÂ’ll both be wagging your tails!
If your dog canÂ’t exercise, you can help by learning canine massage. ItÂ’s therapeutic and stimulates vital tissues. ItÂ’s also fun and feels great.

PUP-ULAR CANINE SPORTS (Little League Anyone?)

Playgrounds and obstacle courses are great ways to have fun and stay in shape. You can construct obstacles using odds and ends in your garden or buy them already made from a pet shop.

Sports Equipment
Treadmills for Dogs
They are great for dogs of all ages, including those that are older and arthritic. Pets can use them if the weather is bad, if they live in an apartment or if you just canÂ’t get outside. Canine treadmills come with adjustable inclines and speeds. They are fun for pets and when your dogÂ’s done you can use it too!

Fun Exercises for Dogs & their People
Walks

All dog love to go for walks. They are especially good for lap and toy breeds that are too small to do a lot of exercises.
Jogging
Jogging is especially fun for bird and herding breeds that love to run. Be careful if itÂ’s very hot or very cold and if your dog stops to lie down you need to stop too

Roller Blading
Roller blading is worth a try. Just like jogging, its fun with dogs that love to run. Be sure you’re good on wheels and don’t forget your kneepads.

Frisbee
Frisbee is great with breeds that like to focus on objects; Border Collies and Australian Shepard’s find Frisbees fascinating.

Swimming
Most bird dogs, Labradors, Retrievers and even some Mastiffs love the water. It is also therapeutic for older, arthritic dogs. Be sure your dog can swim, because like people, not all can. Stay near by and keep a close eye on him.

Have a Ball
WITH BALL GAMES. BE SURE THE BALL IS BIG ENOUGH SO YOUR DOG CANNOT SWALLOW OR CHOKE ON IT. Also make sure it’s made of sturdy material like hard rubber so your dog can’t chew it into little pieces and risk choking. Dogs get plenty of exercise fetching and frolicking with balls. They also enjoy chasing, chewing, bouncing and pouncing on them,
Some balls have compartments you can fill with treats like apples, carrots or cucumbers. They’re purr-fect for pet’s that enjoy a good game of “Hide and Go Seek”. TheyÂ’re also great boredom busters if you’re out for the afternoon or at work.

EXERCISES TO AVOID WITH YOUR DOG
Avoid rough games like tug of war, wrestling and those that involve your dog chasing you. These games encourage aggression and teach your dog to struggle against you as opposed to working with you.

Dr Carol Osborne DVM is the worldÂ’s only veterinarian to be a board certified Diplomat of the American Academy of Anti-Ageing Medicine. She has her own bespoke pet health products at www.drcarol.com

Pet Arthritis – advice from leading vet Carol Osborne

image

By Dr Carol Osborne

Arthritis is a degenerative joint disease which causes painful inflammation of the joints and affects dogs and cats as well as humans. Recent research reveals that arthritis manifests itself in 95% of dogs even at the age two, and 99% of people at age 35, even if there are no visible signs. Twenty percent of all dogs two years of age and older are afflicted.

Symptoms include limping, lameness, decreased activity, stiffness, reluctance to stand, climb stairs, run and jump. In the case of cats they become reluctant to move and often have accidents outside the litter box.

Although arthritis is more common in large dogs, small dogs and cats are also vulnerable to this condition which destroys the cartilage and connective tissue, which normally act as a cushion and absorbs the shock between bones and joints.

But medical management, weight control and moderate exercise can help many pets to live a relatively pain free life even with this condition. This has traditionally consisted of anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids, which are effective in relieving pain but can carry serious side effects. But new, natural remedies are able to offer similar benefits without the risks. Moderate exercise helps maintain joint mobility and muscle strength for joint support. Weight control also helps reduce the burden of excess soft tissue the joints must support.

Like humans pets can benefit from taking supplements that provide relief from pain while increasing joint lubrication and flexibility and enhancing the joints ability to absorb shock. These should contain a range of ingredients including glucosamine, methylsulfonylemethane (MSM, Green Lipped Mussel, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronic acid, natural chelated minerals, Ester C, enzymes and polypeptides.

Since age, breed, diet, lifestyle, injury and stress can affect the health and function of joints in different ways it is always wise to seek the advice of a professional vet.

Dr Carol can be contacted toll free in the US at 1-866 DR CAROL or by email at drcarol@drcarol.com. For more information visit www.drcarol.com

Pet Longevity – Carol Osborne DVM

0977895009_Small.jpg

Dr Carol Osborne DVM is a leading authority on alternative veterinary medicine and age-related pet diseases. She is the world’s only veterinarian to be a board certified Diplomat of the Academy of Anti-Ageing Medicine and is the author of the international best-sellers Naturally Healthy Dogs and Naturally Healthy Cats.

She is also a popular lecturer and broadcaster on the subject of pet longevity and wellness and has her own line of nutritional products for pets. Web site www.drcarol.com Email your pet health concerns to her at Dr Carol Osborne

Doggie diet pill gets approval

New York: A diet pill for dogs has been given approval by the US regulator, the Food and Drug Administration.

This allows qualified US veterinarians to precribe it to pets who have a weight problem. It costs around ÂŁ1 a day to administer.

Manufacturer Pfizer is also waiting for approval from the European Medicines Agency.

The new drug called Slentrol, which is given in liquid form, is said to reduce a dog’s appetite and fat absorption and was shown to reduce weight by 18% and 22% in a clinical trial. But it can have side effects including diarrhoea.And it must not be taken by humans as it can cause liver damage.

Veterinarians estimate that about 40% of dogs in Britain and America are overweight. A survey last year found 81% of British vets considered obesity to be the biggest health threat facing dogs. It is linked with similar problems to humans such as heart disease and obesity.

In the US trials dogs lost about 3% of their weight a month without changing their diets.

UK is a fat pet nation

London: Britain’s pets are getting fatter and fatter, according to a survey from a pet insurer.

More than a third of cats and dogs are obese and vets are now running special clinics to address the problem.

Like their owners, pets put on most weight over the recent festive period, according to the survey by Halifax insurance.

Fat pets die earlier than those at a normal weight and also suffer similar diseases to humans such as heart disease, diabetes and arthritis, which can require prolonged treatment.

The research was carried out among 100 vets and 1,000 pet owners, commissioned by insurance giant Halifax, also showed that four in five dogs do not receive the recommended level of exercise.

Pets have more accidents at Xmas

image

Pets have more accidents in the home at Christmas, according to new research[2] commissioned by ButcherÂ’s Pet Care, 50% of dogs are involved in a Christmas related accidents and one in ten (1/10) have had a trip to the vet as a result.

Knocking over Christmas trees (32%), eating decorations (19%), being electrocuted on the fairy lights and eating more turkey, trimmings and chocolate than is good for them (21%) are amongst some of the commonest mishaps. To help dog owners ButcherÂ’s Dog Food has put together a guide on dog-proofing your house at Christmas to ensure this festive season you have a happy home and not a war zone.

So, to stop your dog barking up the wrong tree, here are Butcher’s Dog Food’s 12 top tips for dog –proofing your home this Christmas:

If you have a real tree, make sure the needles are cleaned up regularly to prevent them getting stuck in paws and throats.

Avoid having flashing lights on your tree, or your dog may go in for the attack or get frightened off!

Decorate with unbreakable baubles and keep any tinsel and ribbon high up on the tree. DON’T put white Angel hair on the tree – this is spun glass and can shred your dogs insides if digested.

When putting up decorative lights, make sure the electric cords are not dangling and if possible tack them down to stop them being chewed or tripped over by a curious dog.

Anchor the tree in place so no inquisitive pooches end up knocking it over when they are nosing around underneath it.

Alcohol may make you merry but if drunk your four legged friend will be as sick as a dog. After Xmas parties tip away dregs so your dog doesnÂ’t help clear up and end up with a hangover himself

Make sure any burning candles are well out of the way – a wagging tail can knock things over or catch fire!

Festive blooms can be poisonous – don’t let your dog chew on any Poinsettias, Holly or Mistletoe or they could get a very uncomfortable stomach.

No-one expects Christmas to be a Silent Night, but all that festive cheer, balloons, poppers, crackers can drive your dog potty. Make sure they have a safe haven to escape to for an undisturbed relax.

Try not to over-indulge your dog with human food treats. Avoid giving them chocolate, which can potentially be poisonous or meat with bones as these can splinter and get lodged in small throats.

Instead your four legged friend will appreciate a naturally nutritious meal packed with tasty meat. This will insure he is as Fit As A ButcherÂ’s Dog all Christmas long! So go on crack open a can of ButcherÂ’s Dog Food!

Last but not leastÂ…just because you are outside it doesnÂ’t mean your dog is out of Christmas danger! If youÂ’re going for a Christmas drive but your car is frozen keep dogs away from the anti freeze. They love the sweet taste but it is lethal if swallowed. If your dog is affected then seek immediate veterinary advice.

And finally, kick back, relax and enjoy a dog disaster-free zone all Christmas long!

Looking after your pet’s teeth

image

Cats and dogs need regular dental care. Although pets rarely suffer from dental decay they, like humans, can suffer from gum disease or broken teeth.

The reason that animals suffer less from tooth decay is that their diets are usually low in carbohydrate and their saliva is low in acid which protects the teeth. This is why is not good to give pets chocolates and sweets.

Like their owners pets benefit from regular brushing and a trip to the pet dental hygenist to keep teeth and gums healthy.

Periodontal disease

Exactly as in humans pets can suffer from periodontal disease, which attacks the gums, bones and other tissue around the teeth and eventually to tooth loss.

This disease starts with a build-up of plaque whch turns to tartar which provides a perfect climate for bacteria to multiply – these are the same bacteria thought to be a contributor to heart disease in humans. Likewise in animals it can aggravate problems for animals. The tartar also causes gum inflammation. Buy pets healthy chews to exercise their gums.

CARING FOR A PETS TEETH

As soon as a puppy or kitten first grows teeth, check that they are growing properly and are not crooked or causing pressure inside the mouth. If necessary ask your vet to look the animal over. Some smaller dogs are are more at risk of these problems.

Good oral hygiene for pets includes regular brushing. You may have to get your pet used to having a brush in its mouth. Again you can ask a vet to help teach you how to train your pet to accept this. There are special toothbrushes for pets that can be bought from pet stores.

Like humans if your pet has bleeding gums you should consult a vet.

Tooth-decay on the increase amongst pets, say US researchers

Dogs and cats need regular dental care, say experts at the leading pet nutrition company, Iams.

Just like humans they can suffer from gum disease and broken teeth. Although the shape of their teethcombined with a low-carbyhydrate diet means they are unlikely to suffer from decay.

Owners are advised to get professional dental care for pet’s teetch, including regular brushing and cleaning and also toys to chew on.

Periodontal disease, which affects the gums, bones, and connective tissue around the teeth, can cause tooth loss. First, plaque—a soft, clear or cream-colored deposit—forms on the teeth. If it isn’t removed, minerals in the animal’s saliva turn plaque into tartar. Tartar builds up below the gums and bacteria grow, causing inflammation.

The same bacteria which cause the inflammation can enter your pet’s bloodstream and cause or aggravate lung, kidney, liver, and heart problems—a lot of trouble from something that could be stopped in its early stages.

Dental care for pets should be started when the animal is a puppy or kitten so that they become accustomed to having their mouths handled. It also helps with general training and obedience.

The right foods also assist in dental health. For example dry foods and treats help clean plaqye from the teeth and rawhide chews are also good cleaning tools, as are a number of knobby plastic toys on the market. None of these are hard enough to cause tooth damage, but you need to watch your pet to be sure small pieces of the toys aren’t torn off and swallowed. Real bones can also be dangerous for your pet and should not be used for teeth cleaning purposes.

Train pets to accept brushing by running a finger gently over the pet’s gums, starting with the outside then try inside as the animal gets used to the routine. Next try wrapping a finger with gauze and rubbing the gums and if this is successful use pet toothpaste. After a few weeks the pet should be willing to accept a pet toothbrush, which should be used with gentle upand down strokes, twice weekly.

If a pet won’t allow this then a vet should be consulted and he may consider using a general anaesthetic to enable the animals teeth to be cleaned.

Acupuncture

ACUPUNCTURE is practised mostly on horses, dogs and cats, but other animals do benefit. It has been tried at some point on most species, including rabbits, cattle, pigs, parrots, birds of prey, guinea pigs and rats. Pets can undergo acupuncture for a wide range of conditions such as joint problems, pain and inflammation, muscle spasms, wound repair, lameness and nerve problems, and after accidents and surgery. It is also given to induce labour and to help animals giving birth. Incontinence can be eased and some inflammatory skin problems will also respond.

With horses, acupuncture may improve endurance and stamina. During treatment, very fine needles are used at specific points on the body, but for sensitive or worried pets a special laser, photonic or electrical stimulation can be used instead.
When the needle reaches a specific point there may be a sensation like a dull ache and some pets find this uncomfortable.The other options are gentler and less invasive. If your vet doesn’t practise acupuncture, he can refer you to a specialist.